Lamborghini Bosozoku: Morohoshi-san, the Underground Hero -Video
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Lamborghini Bosozoku: Morohoshi-san, the Underground Hero

Through the lens of Luke Huxham and his mini-documentary Underground Hero: Love To Hate Me, we take a look at the underground automotive culture reaped by some of Japan’s most dangerous drivers. The video features a lot of bikers on heavily modified Honda and Suzuki bikes, Lamborghini cars and Yakuzas in Tokyo’s Kabukicho district.

Morohoshi-san is living between the lines, somewhere in that gray section as he calls it. Mixing with the undesirables and modifying his Lamborghini in ways most of us would never dream of doing or want for that matter.

The film is about 8 mn long and show the stunning cars through the city, wildly tricked out with neon chassis lighting, but also delves in to Moroshi-san’s first encounter with a Lamborghini Countach, childhood disobedience.

Underground Hero: Love To Hate Me

Underground Hero: Love To Hate Me

Underground Hero: Love To Hate Me

Underground Hero: Love To Hate Me

 

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The word bōsōzoku is also applied to motorcycle subculture with an interest in motorcycle customizing, often illegal, and making noise by removing the mufflers on their vehicles so that morenoise is produced. These bōsōzoku groups also engage in dangerous or reckless driving, such as weaving in traffic, not wearing motorcycle helmets, and running red lights. Another activity isshinai bōsō (市内暴走) speeding in city streets, not usually for street racing but more for thrills. With many bikes involved, the leading one is driven by the sentōsha (先頭車), the leader, who is responsible for the event and is not allowed to be overtaken. Japanese police call them Maru-Sō (police code マル走 or 丸走), and dispatch a police vehicle to trail any groups of bikes to prevent any possible incidents, which can include riding through suburbs at speeds of 5–10 mph, creating a loud disturbance and waving imperial Japanese flags, to starting fights which can include weapons such as wooden swords, metal pipes, baseball bats and Molotov cocktails. These bōsōzoku gangs are generally composed of people under the legal adult age, which in Japan is 20 years old.

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