Landline by Aakash Nihalani -Street art
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Landline by Aakash Nihalani

Landline by Aakash Nihalani

Landline by Aakash Nihalani is a new series of installations by the New York artist that explore themes of isolation and community.

For his new project, the artist is using his usual style using neon tape to create isometric forms. The installation are not “simply” displayed on walls but they look as if the people are skewered. The pieces used are hand made out of tape, fluorescent paper, and corrugated plastic. Aakash also used a magnetic hanging system on the t-shirts.

Aakash worked with bold isometric forms created from bright neon tape, AA transforms outdoor spaces (and often people) into playful installations.

In these new outdoor works, colorful bars pass through individuals, connecting them to each other and functioning as extensions of the urban landscape. the participants examine their own insides and connections, a visual expression of both the isolation and community I often feel living in Brooklyn. We spend so much time existing in virtual reality, these works are a visible connection to the real world.

 

Aakash Nihalani Landline

Landline by Aakash Nihalani

"Someone Looking at Someone Looking at Art" by Aakash Nihalani

“Someone Looking at Someone Looking at Art” by Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani Landline

Landline by Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani Landline

Landline by Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani Landline

Landline by Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani Landline

Landline by Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani Landline

Landline by Aakash Nihalani

Aakash Nihalani Landline | Detail

Detail

[divider]About [/divider]

Born in Queens (USA), but of Indian heritage, Aakash Nihalani (1986) utilizes colored, oftentimes fluorescent, adhesive tape to create simple geometric shapes that simulate three-dimensionality and function as deceptive continuations of the surrounding adjacent structures. Once the optical illusions are created, it is the human body that brings them to life, achieving a visual effect that is surprising and unexpected each time. In Aakash’s installations people interact with the geometry as they would with 3-dimensional depth and perspective, as both players and as spectators alike. More

Source: eyescreamsunday.com