Mantis Lamps by Bernard Schottlander for Lampe Gras -Design, Lighting
2033
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Bernard Schottlander Mantis Lamps

Mantis Lamps by Bernard Schottlander for Lampe Gras

Mainly a sculptor, Bernard Schottlander designed a series of steel lamps called Mantis in 1951. The lamps are reissued by French company DCW éditions ( also behind the reissue of the famous Lampe Gras), and are presented at the Salon Maison & Objet this month. Influenced by the mid-century abstract sculptures of Alexander Calder and Henry Moore, German-born and UK-based Schottlander created this subtle series of lamps in the style of Serge Mouille and Gino Sarfatti.

The Mantis Floor lamp by Bernard Schottlander has been recreated from his 1951 series of lights. This is an eye-catching floor lamp on an impressive scale. The sculptural form is backed up by the functionality. The lamp may be rotated by 360 degrees around the base with 5 arm positions to allow for adjustment in elevation. Available in all black satin, black satin body with a bright red outer shade or grey body with a black satin outer shade. The inner shade is shiny white for all options. The Lamp series includes a floor lamp, a table lamp and a wall lamp with different lengths.

 

MANTIS line - BS 1 - Floor lamp

MANTIS line – BS 1 – Floor lamp

MANTIS line - BS 1 - Floor lamp

MANTIS line – BS 1 – Floor lamp

MANTIS line - BS 2 - Wall lamp

MANTIS line – BS 2 – Wall lamp

MANTIS line - BS 2 - Wall lamp

MANTIS line – BS 3 – Table lamp

MANTIS line - BS 2 - Wall lamp

MANTIS line – BS 2 – Wall lamp

 

About Bernard Schottlander

Bernard Schottlander (1924-1999) was born in Mainz, Germany in 1924 and moved to England in 1939. During the war he worked in a factory as a welder, before taking a course in Sculpture at Leeds College of Art and subsequently – with the help of a bursary – at the Anglo-French art centre in St John’s Wood. He studied sculpture for a year in London, and his training as a welder influenced his work heavily. Bernard Schottlander described himself as a designer for interiors and a sculptor for exteriors.

He opened a studio in North London with his assistant George Nash, who had himself learned his craft in the Royal Air Force’s workshops. Their work at this stage was essentially artistic in nature, seeking to explore new forms and each piece was handmade in strictly limited editions. In 1963 he decided to concentrate solely on sculpture and from 1965 he taught metalwork at St Martins School. In the same year he was part of the group show Six Artists at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London and in the following year (1966) had his first solo show at the Hamilton Galleries, London.

 

More
www.schottlander.fr

www.dcw-editions.fr